What’s Your Opinion?


Tom’s my go-to guy for bike mechanics.

Lots of knowledge, years of experience, incredible patience, great attention to detail…I trust his judgment and wisdom.

Jut as important, Tom won’t pretend to know what he doesn’t know. He doesn’t fear not having every answer. Lots of folks know about bikes, but when Tom offers an opinion I trust it’s based on solid information.

Tom’s an expert. He knows a lot, he knows what he knows, and he knows what he doesn’t know.

Democracy leads to an interesting paradox. Everyone’s opinion matters, but that surely does not mean every opinion ought to carry equal weight. Equal rights doesn’t mean equal ability or equal knowledge, and it certainly doesn’t mean all opinions on a given subject are equally valid. Opinions based on knowledge and experience aren’t foolproof, and even experts make mistakes. But surely we’re better when we listen to and learn from those who’ve actually studied and worked with the subject matter.

The Internet contributes to the dangerous notion that all opinions are created equal. With a few clicks, anyone’s an expert. Got a headache? You’ll find dozens of opinions, and suddenly your doc’s medical degree and years of experience are diminished. Maybe that website (with five stars!) knows as much as the brain surgeon. Anyone can comment on anything – anonymously – without risk of having to defend or being held accountable if they’re objectively wrong.

Don’t like the answer? Just keep clicking until I find a better one. Doesn’t matter if it’s correct, if it’s based on facts or truth or reality, as long as it supports my pre-conceived conclusion. So we devolve from a search for what’s right into a quest to be right, at any cost.

I know a bit about human trafficking. When I tell you something, I want it to be the truth, based on facts and evidence. When I’m not sure I ask Jon at Project Rescue. Jon says a child like the one in the photo will be trafficked – used for sex – in the next 30 seconds.

Doesn’t stop people from offering opinions about “those sorts of women” and “it’s their choice.” Doesn’t prevent political notions about “motivating people to make better decisions.”

Also doesn’t mean those opinions are based on truth or reality.

The kids at the HOME OF HOPE – and their mothers – didn’t choose to be slaves. They deserve hope. They deserve the opportunity to become the bright, shining lights God intended.

That’s why we ride bikes. Join us? https://frontrangefreedomtour.org/

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